Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Aquaculture Students rescuing a fish

Fisheries and Aquaculture Courses

Course offerings vary from year to year. Check Generate a Timetable for available course offerings.

AQUA 101 (3) Introduction to Aquaculture

This course introduces students to the aquaculture industry and aquaculture practices in the Pacific Northwest, North America and globally. Topics will include history, regulations, science, animal health and welfare, technology, and current topics. In addition, invited speakers from specific areas will be invited to share their expertise. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. "C+" in either Biology 11 or Biology 12.

Co-requisites: None.

AQUA 307 (1) Preparation for Co-Operative Education Employment

This course will help students identify, develop and establish themselves as an emerging professional who is able to effectively enter and navigate any Aquaculture work setting. (0:1:0 for 5 weeks)

Prerequisite: Min. "C-" in AQUA 101. Acceptance into the Minor in Aquaculture program and permission of the Chair.

AQUA 308 (3) Co-operative Work Placement I

Individual students are carefully matched to employers within the aquaculture industry who supervise them and evaluate their performance during paid work experience. (0:0:0)

Prerequisite: AQUA 101, AQUA 307, and acceptance into the Minor in Aquaculture program.

AQUA 309 (3) Co-operative Work Placement II

Individual students are carefully matched to employers within the aquaculture industry who supervise them and evaluate their performance during paid work experience. (0:0:0)

Prerequisite: AQUA 101, AQUA 307, and acceptance into the Minor in Aquaculture program.

AQUA 323 (3) Invertebrate Aquaculture

A review of invertebrate culture methods, including the culture of small larvae and live feeds, shrimp farming, oyster hatchery operations, oyster grow-out technology, and culture of other molluscs such as clams, mussels and scallops. Some larval rearing techniques are applicable to fish, especially those with very small larvae. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: Min. "C-" in AQUA 101, BIOL 121 and BIOL 123.

AQUA 328 (3) Methods and Techniques of Finfish Culture

This course will teach how rearing and husbandry systems are designed to match the biological needs and limitations of finfish biology. Topics will discuss methods, techniques, and historical and modern technology and summarize the biological demands (i.e., oxygen, temperature) of the animals that are supported. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. "C-" in AQUA 101, BIOL 121, BIOL 123, and a 200-level or higher BIOL or CHEM course.

AQUA 332 (3) Finfish, Shellfish, and Crustacean Nutrition

This course will introduce the various nutritional requirements for growth, development, metabolic processes, and health, and outline relevant practical feeding programs and feed production technologies in sustainable fish, shellfish, and crustacean aquaculture. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. "C-" in AQUA 101, BIOL 121 and BIOL 123.

AQUA 342 (3) Finfish, Shellfish and Crustacean Health

An investigation into the pathological effects of infections and non-infectious diseases in fish, shellfish, and crustaceans with emphasis on current diagnostic methods, biosecurity control strategies, and environmental factors that influence disease and disease transmission in sustainable aquaculture. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: Min. "C-" in AQUA 101, BIOL 121, BIOL 123, and a 200-level or higher BIOL or CHEM course.

AQUA 375 (3) Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS)

An overview of the latest advances in recirculating aquaculture systems with a focus on water recirculation and treatment. Examples of both fresh and salt water RAS designed for either finfish or shellfish will be discussed with respect to emerging technologies. The delivery will incorporate theoretical and hands-on experiential learning. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: Min. "C-" in AQUA 101, BIOL 121, BIOL 123, and CHEM 212.

AQUA 408 (3) Co-operative Work Placement III

Individual students are carefully matched to employers within the aquaculture industry who supervise them and evaluate their performance during paid work experience. (0:0:0)

Prerequisite: AQUA 101, AQUA 307, acceptance into the Minor in Aquaculture program.

AQUA 409 (3) Co-operative Work Placement IV

Individual students are carefully matched to employers within the aquaculture industry who supervise them and evaluate their performance during paid work experience. (0:0:0)

Prerequisite: AQUA 101, AQUA 307, acceptance into the Minor in Aquaculture program.

AQUA 441 (3) Hatchery Technology and Genetics in Shellfish Aquaculture

This course will address theoretical knowledge and practical experience in Shellfish Aquaculture at the Deep Bay Marine Field station hatchery. Students will integrate knowledge about shellfish early life history stages with sessions on hatchery-scale algal culture yields. This is an intense 2-week course to occur in May. (22.5:0:12.5 for 2 weeks)

Prerequisite: Min. "C-" in BIOL 212 and AQUA 323.

FISH 100T Introductory Field Trip

An introduction to the different facets of the local aquaculture industry and facilities. Includes selected topics of classroom instruction and first aid training. FISH 100T was formerly called AQUA 100T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:45 for 1 weeks)

Prerequisite: Admission to program.

FISH 115 (3) Life History and Management of Salmonids

A review of salmonids natural history in B.C.; the implications of life-history patterns; and the opportunity these patterns provide for fisheries managers, including a review of government stocking and enhancement strategies, as well as fisheries regulation. FISH 115 was formerly called FISH 211; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 123 (4) Concepts in Biology

An overview of biological principles and concepts, with an emphasis on aquatic examples. Topics include properties of biological molecules, metabolism, cell structure and function, genetics, physiology, and animal development. (3:0:2)

Prerequisite: Admission to Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma program.

FISH 124 (4) Biology of Fishes (Ends Aug 2021)

A study of the life histories of salt and freshwater fishes, emphasizing physiology, behaviour and ecology. Laboratory work emphasizes fish anatomy and identification, primarily of B.C. fishes. FISH 124 was formerly called FISH 131; credit will not be granted for both courses. Credit will only be granted for one of FISH 324A or FISH 124. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: FISH 123 or BIOL 121, and FISH 132.

FISH 124 (4) Biology of Fishes (Effective Sep 2021)

A study of the life histories of salt and freshwater fishes, emphasizing physiology, behaviour and ecology. Laboratory work emphasizes fish anatomy and identification, primarily of B.C. fishes. FISH 124 was formerly called FISH 131; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:2)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 127 (3) Fish Husbandry II (Ends Aug 2021)

An examination of current salmonid practices including early rearing, smoltification, grow-out and harvesting techniques and husbandry. The course content is organized to correspond with activities at local hatcheries and grow out ponds where students will participate in fish culture work during field days and work opportunities during the summer. FISH 127 was formerly called AQUA 122; credit will not be granted for both courses. (4:0:1)

Prerequisite: FISH 227.

FISH 127 (3) Introduction to Salmonid Husbandry (Effective Sep 2021)

An examination of current salmonid culture and husbandry practices including brood stock selection, fertilization, early rearing, smoltification, grow-out, and harvesting techniques and husbandry. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 132 (3) Aquatic Habitats (Ends Aug 2021)

Topics include limnology of streams and lakes, estuaries, coastal marine and offshore marine habitats, both temperate and tropical. The lab concentrates on freshwater and marine water quality and methods of water analysis. (3:0:2)

Prerequisite: Admission to diploma program.

FISH 132 (3) Aquatic Habitats (Effective Sep 2021)

Topics include limnology of streams and lakes, estuaries, coastal marine and offshore marine habitats, both temperate and tropical. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 133 (3) Aquatic Plant and Algae Ecology and Culture

An introduction to aquatic botany including the ecology, physiology, and taxonomy of marine and fresh water macrophytes. In additon the culture of seaweeds emphasizing Canadian species will be examined. FISH 133 was formerly called FISH 204; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:1.5)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 161 (1) Fisheries and Aquaculture Technician Skills I

This course is an introduction to hands on skills associated with assessing water quality in aquaculture settings. Students will be relied on to learn and use a variety of equipment to assess physico-chemical water parameters. (0:0:2)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 162 (1) Fisheries and Aquaculture Technician Skills II

A series of topics including practical training in manual skills useful in the industry, and training with materials and equipment, as well as special lectures. FISH 162 was formerly called FISH 162T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:2)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 162T (1) Shop Skills

A series of topics including practical training in manual skills useful in the industry, including "hands-on" training with materials and equipment, as well as special lectures. FISH 162T was formerly called AQUA 162T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (2:0:2)

Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

FISH 171 (1) Fisheries and Aquaculture Work Experience I

The first in a series of courses designed to introduce students with the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week for 6 weeks working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 171 was formerly called FISH 171T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -48 for 6 weeks)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 171T (1) Aquaculture Practicum I

The first in a series of courses designed to acquaint students with the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 171T was formerly called AQUA 171T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -120)

Prerequisite: Admission to program.

FISH 172 (1) Fisheries and Aquaculture Work Experience II

The second in a series of courses designed to fully acquaint students with the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week for 6 weeks working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 172 was formerly called FISH 172T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -48 for 6 weeks)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 172T (1) Aquaculture Practicum II

The second in a series of courses designed to fully acquaint students with the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 172T was formerly called AQUA 172T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -120)

Prerequisite: Completion of first semester of the diploma program.

FISH 173T (1) Work Experience

A summer work session in either fisheries or aquaculture, usually undertaken between years 1 and 2 of the diploma program. The work position must be approved by program faculty. This course requires completion of an oral presentation and successful completion of this course is required for graduation. FISH 173T was formerly called AQUA 173T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -600)

Prerequisite: Completion of the second semester of the diploma program.

FISH 191 (3) Applied Techniques in Aquatic Systems & Fisheries I

This course is designed to give students practical experience in both supervised and unsupervised environments. Students will choose from a selection of content, including but not limited to: salmonid conservation, salmonid culture, aquaponics, fish health, alternate species culture, and invertebrate culture. Not all content is available every year. FISH 191 was formerly called FISH 191T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:4)

Prerequisite: Admission into the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 191T (1) Project in Husbandry I

The commencement of a project which will continue through all four semesters of the program. A progress report is required at the end of each semester. The project will be approved by a faculty Advisor who supervises the work throughout the four semesters. FISH 191T was formerly called AQUA 191T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:8)

Prerequisite: Admission to the program.

FISH 192 (3) Applied Techniques in Aquatic Systems & Fisheries II

This course is designed to give students practical experience in both supervised and unsupervised environments. Students will choose from a selection of content, including but not limited to: salmonid conservation, salmonid culture, aquaponics, fish health, alternate species culture, and invertebrate culture. Not all content is available every year. FISH 192 was formerly called FISH 192T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:4)

Prerequisite: FISH 191.

FISH 192T (1) Project in Aquaculture II

A continuation of FISH 191T with a second progress report required. FISH 192T was formerly called AQUA 192T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:8)

Prerequisite: FISH 191T.

FISH 204 (4) Aquatic Plant Ecology and Culture

An introduction to aquatic botany including the ecology, physiology, and taxonomy of marine and fresh water macrophytes. In additon the culture of seaweeds emphasizing Canadian species will be examined. FISH 204 was formerly called AQUA 204; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: Admission to program.

FISH 205 (4) Invertebrate Zoology (Ends Aug 2021)

An introduction to the functional morphology, ecology, and behaviour of invertebrates, stressing symbiotic interactions and natural history of marine invertebrates of the Pacific northwest. FISH 205 was formerly called AQUA 205; credit will not be granted for both courses. Credit will only be granted for one of BIOL 310 or FISH 205. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the second year of the diploma or degree program.

FISH 205 (3) Invertebrate Zoology (Effective Sep 2021)

An introduction to the functional morphology, ecology, and behaviour of invertebrates, stressing symbiotic interactions and natural history of marine invertebrates of the Pacific northwest. FISH 205 was formerly called AQUA 205; credit will not be granted for both courses. Credit will only be granted for one of BIOL 310 or FISH 205. (3:0:1.5)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 210 (3) Trout Culture

A project to simulate a trout farm and allow students to develop strategies for trout culture. Seminars are included. FISH 210 was formerly called AQUA 211; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Admission into second year of the diploma program.

FISH 211 (3) Life History and Management of Salmonids

A review of salmonids natural history in B.C.; the implications of life-history patterns; and the opportunity these patterns provide for fisheries managers, including a review of government stocking and enhancement strategies, as well as fisheries regulation. (3:0:0)

Co-requisites: FISH 123 or BIOL 121.

FISH 222 (4) Larval Rearing and Invertebrate Culture (Ends Aug 2021)

A review of invertebrate culture methods, including the culture of small larvae and live feeds, shrimp farming, oyster hatchery operations, oyster grow-out technology, and culture of other molluscs such as clams, mussels and scallops. Some larval rearing techniques are applicable to fish, especially those with very small larvae. FISH 222 was formerly called AQUA 222; credit will not be granted for both courses. (2:0:3)

Prerequisite: FISH 132, FISH 205, and either FISH 127 or FISH 327.

FISH 222 (3) Larval Rearing and Invertebrate Culture (Effective Sep 2021)

A review of invertebrate culture methods, including the culture of small larvae and live feeds, shrimp farming, oyster hatchery operations, oyster grow-out technology, and culture of other molluscs such as clams, mussels and scallops. Some larval rearing techniques are applicable to fish, especially those with very small larvae. FISH 222 was formerly called AQUA 222; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:1.5)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 223 (3) Introduction to Fisheries Management

An introduction to data requirements for fisheries management, data collection, analysis and application. Students will review Canadian and international marine fisheries, their regulatory frameworks, assessment requirements, international conventions, legal decisions and scale of these fisheries. Using examples, roles of regional fisheries management organizations will be presented with successes and failures. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: MATH 181 or MATH 211, FISH 124 or FISH 324, and FISH 211.

FISH 227 (3) Fish Husbandry I

An examination of salmonid culture including broodstock management (capture, determination of gonadal development, egg takes) and incubating eggs and alevins to the time of ponding and first feeding. The course parallels events in local hatcheries where students participate in fish culture work during field days. FISH 227 was formerly called AQUA 227; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Admission to the diploma or degree program.

FISH 231 (3) Non-salmonid Aquaculture (Ends Aug 2021)

Advanced husbandry considerations associated with fish (and other aquatic ectotherms) culture including growth, thermal biology, metabolism, stress and other general fish physiology, with a focus on non-salmonid species. Multiple case studies addressed, including tilapia, catfish, and carp. FISH 231 was formerly called AQUA 231; credit will not be granted for both courses. (5:0:0)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma program.

FISH 231 (3) Non-Salmonid Culture (Effective Sep 2021)

Advanced husbandry considerations associated with fish (and other aquatic ectotherms) culture including growth, thermal biology, metabolism, stress and other general fish physiology, with a focus on non-salmonid species. Multiple case studies addressed, including tilapia, catfish, and carp. FISH 231 was formerly called AQUA 231; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 241 (4) Fish Health (Ends Aug 2021)

An investigation of fish pathology. Topics include the prevention, identification, and treatment of the principal fish diseases in cultured salmonids; and the impact of disease, parasites, and toxic substances on wild fish populations. FISH 241 was formerly called AQUA 241; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: FISH 124.

FISH 241 (3) Fish Health (Effective Sep 2021)

An investigation of fish pathology. Topics include the prevention, identification, and treatment of the principal fish diseases in cultured salmonids; and the impact of disease, parasites, and toxic substances on wild fish populations. FISH 241 was formerly called AQUA 241; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:2)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 253 (3) Fisheries Engineering I-Hydrology

Watershed hydrology and principles of field measurements. Includes the effects of land use and the practical aspects of making hydrologic measurements. Explores surveying techniques to accurately collect and display field data. Requires completion of a physical map and a detailed report for a selected urban stream. (3:0:4)

Prerequisite: FISH 211 and either MATH 122 or MATH 181.

FISH 254 (3) Fisheries Engineering II - Hydraulics (Ends Aug 2021)

An in-depth look at water resource engineering, focusing on enclosed systems. Topics include principles of flow including flow measurements, piping systems, pump selection, hydraulics of cultural units, and development of aquaculture facilities. Examines various recirculation possibilities. Includes a project on a current engineering topic. FISH 254 was formerly called AQUA 254; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: FISH 211 and either MATH 122 or MATH 181.

FISH 254 (3) Fisheries Engineering II - Hydraulics (Effective Sep 2021)

An in-depth look at water resource engineering, focusing on enclosed systems. Topics include principles of flow including flow measurements, piping systems, pump selection, hydraulics of cultural units, and development of aquaculture facilities. Examines various recirculation possibilities. Includes a project on a current engineering topic. FISH 254 was formerly called AQUA 254; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:2)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 255 (3) Fish Habitat Assessment and Rehabilitation

An ecosystem-based course which explores the interrelationships of fish habitat and stream ecology. The overall theme utilizes fundamental concepts to further understand the complex interactions between physical factors and biological processes that define fish habitat. Procedural emphasis is on sampling freshwater streams of BC, particularly Vancouver Island. FISH 255 was formerly called FISH 453; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 271 (2) Fisheries and Aquaculture Work Experience III

The third in a series of courses on the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week for a full semester working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 271 was formerly called FISH 271T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -80)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 271T (1) Aquaculture Practicum III

The third in a series of courses on the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 271T was formerly called AQUA 271T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -120)

Prerequisite: Completion of second semester of the diploma program.

FISH 272 (2) Fisheries and Aquaculture Work Experience IV

The fourth in a series of courses on the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 272 was formerly called FISH 272T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -80)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 272T (1) Aquaculture Practicum IV

The fourth in a series of courses on the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 272T was formerly called AQUA 272T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -120)

Prerequisite: Completion of third semester of the diploma program.

FISH 273 Summer Work Experience

A summer work session in either fisheries or aquaculture, usually undertaken between years 1 and 2 of the diploma program. The work position must be approved by program faculty. This course requires completion of an oral presentation and successful completion of this course is required for graduation. FISH 273 was formerly called AQUA 173T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -600)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 281 (3) Fisheries Field Techniques (Ends Aug 2021)

An examination of field sampling and biological survey techniques with application to standard methodologies. Typically, a lake or stream survey carried out under fly-camp conditions. Note: Students are required to participate in a 5 day field trip in the week prior to the start of regular classes. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: FISH 124 and either FISH 123 or BIOL 121 and either FISH 204 or BIOL 122.

FISH 281 (3) Freshwater Fisheries Field Techniques (Effective Sep 2021)

This course is an examination of field sampling and biological survey techniques with application to standard methodologies. Students will be trained in a variety of freshwater techniques associated with the environmental consulting industry. (0:0:3)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 291 (3) Applied Techniques in Aquatic Systems & Fisheries III

This course is designed to give students practical experience in both supervised and unsupervised environments. Students will choose from a selection of content, including but not limited to: salmonid conservation, salmonid culture, aquaponics, fish health, alternate species culture, and invertebrate culture. Not all content is available every year. FISH 291 was formerly called FISH 291T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:4)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 291T (1) Project in Aquaculture III

A continuation of FISH 191T and FISH 192T, requiring a third progress report. FISH 291T was formerly called AQUA 291T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:8)

Prerequisite: FISH 191T and FISH 192T.

FISH 292 (3) Applied Techniques in Aquatic Systems & Fisheries IV

This course is designed to give students practical experience in both supervised and unsupervised environments. Students will choose from a selection of content, including but not limited to: salmonid conservation, salmonid culture, aquaponics, fish health, alternate species culture, and invertebrate culture. Not all content is available every year. FISH 292 was formerly called FISH 292T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:4)

Prerequisite: Completion of first year of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology Diploma.

FISH 292T (1) Project in Aquaculture IV

The final course in the project series (FISH 191T, FISH 192T, and FISH 291T). A final report may be required detailing the methods and results of all four semesters. FISH 292T was formerly called AQUA 292T; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:8)

Prerequisite: FISH 191T, FISH 192T, and FISH 291T.

FISH 322 (3) Coastal and Estuarine Ecosystems

This course explores the ecology of the marine environment, including physical and biological oceanographic processes, primary productivity, larval ecology, intertidal habitats, benthic ecosystems, estuaries and climate change. Lectures cover case studies on coastal fisheries and aquaculture management. Includes field trips, oceanographic data analyses and marine chart mapping. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: Both of FISH 204 and FISH 205, or BIOL 202.

FISH 324 (4) Ichthyology

Taxonomy, ecology, behaviour, and physiology of marine and freshwater fishes. Laboratory emphasis is on anatomy, aging, classification, and identification of worldwide fishes. (3:0:3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 122 and either FISH 123 or BIOL 122.

FISH 371 (3) Aquaculture Practices I

The third in a series of courses on the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 371 was formerly called AQUA 371; credit will not be granted for both courses. Credit will only be granted for one of FISH 171T and FISH 172T or FISH 371. (0:0:0 -120)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Fisheries and Aquaculture Post Degree Diploma or degree program.

FISH 372 (3) Aquaculture Practices II

The fourth in a series of courses on the operation of fish culture facilities. Students will spend an average of one day a week working at a fisheries or aquaculture facility. FISH 372 was formerly called AQUA 372; credit will not be granted for both courses. Credit will only be granted for one of FISH 271T and FISH 272T or FISH 372. (0:0:0 -120)

Prerequisite: Admission in the Fisheries and Aquaculture Post Degree Diploma or degree program.

FISH 392 (3) Project in Husbandry IV

The final course in the project series. A final report is required detailing the methods and results of all four semesters. FISH 392 was formerly called AQUA 392; credit will not be granted for both courses. Credit will only be granted for one of FISH 292T or FISH 392. (0:0:8)

Prerequisite: FISH 191T and FISH 192T.

FISH 473 (3) Summer Field Practicum

A 4-month work session in either fisheries or aquaculture, usually in the summer between years 3 and 4 of the program. Must be approved by program faculty. Requires completion of an oral presentation and successful completion of this course is a prerequisite to completing the program. FISH 473 was formerly called AQUA 473; credit will not be granted for both courses. (0:0:0 -640 for 16 weeks)

Prerequisite: Third-year standing or permission of Chair of Fisheries and Aquaculture.

FISH 490 (3) Directed Studies in Fisheries and Aquaculture

Project is planned with an instructor in the department who will act as academic supervisor. Projects are varied, but usually include library research as well as direct experimentation of field data collection. Work is distinct from FISH 491 project. This course may be repeated once for credit. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair.

FISH 491 (6) Undergraduate Research Project

An introduction to research methods. In conjunction with a faculty supervisor, students develop a research proposal during the spring prior to their research, implement the research, prepare a formal written scientific report, and give a verbal presentation of the results of the research. Note: A Faculty Advisor Endorsement form is required for registration and must be completed in the year prior to undertaking this course. (0:0:3 for two semesters) (0:0:3 for 30 weeks)

Prerequisite: Third-year standing, min. "B" in both MATH 181 and MATH 203, and permission from a faculty member.