Bachelor of Science, Major, Minor in Psychology

Psychology

Courses

Course offerings vary from year to year. Check Generate a Timetable for available course offerings.

The Psychology department offers courses required to complete VIU's Bachelor of Arts Major or Minor in Psychology.

High school students who are interested in completing a Major in Psychology are strongly encouraged to take grade 12 Math and Biology.

Notes

Distribution requirements within Psychology are defined as follows:

  1. Bio/Neuropsychology: 315, 345A, 445;
  2. Cognition/Perception: 313, 317A, 326;
  3. Social/Health: 327, 331;
  4. Developmental: 335, 336, 339;
  5. Personality/Clinical: 330, 430, 436;
  6. History/Theory: 310, 410.

Prerequisites for all Psychology courses numbered 300 and above are PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and PSYC 204, or instructor's permission to take PSYC 204 concurrently, unless otherwise stated in the course descriptions below.

See also Adult Basic Education (ABE) Upgrading Courses.

PSYC 103  (3)  Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour (Ends Apr 2017)

An introduction to biogenetic, psychoanalytic and psychological explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour. Topics include an examination of relevant perspectives, theories and research methods, both historically and in relation to the current application of criminal law in Canada, as well as psychoanalytic theory, heredity, conditioning, social learning theory, cognitive theory, and situational determinants of behaviour. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112 recommended.

PSYC 103  (3)  Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour (Effective May 2017)

An introduction to biopsychosocial explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour. Topics include an examination of relevant perspectives, theoretical approaches and research methods, both historically and in relation to the current application of criminal law in Canada. Credit will only be granted for one of CRIM 103 or PSYC 103. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112 recommended.

PSYC 111  (3)  Contemporary Psychology I

A survey of the current status of selected areas, emphasizing the scientific approach to the study of behaviour of humans and animals. Topics include physiology, sensation, perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, methodology, and introduction to statistics. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: None. Successful completion of Grade 12 English or equivalent is recommended.

PSYC 112  (3)  Contemporary Psychology II

A survey of the current status of selected areas, emphasizing the scientific approach to the study of behaviour of humans and animals. Topics include development, language and thought, personality assessment, intelligence, personality theory, adjustment, abnormal behaviour, therapies, and social behaviour. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: None.

PSYC 121  (3)  Developmental Psychology (Ends Apr 2017)

An investigation of the main processes of development, emphasizing cognition, perception, emotion, language and personality. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: None.

PSYC 121  (3)  Developmental Psychology (Effective May 2017)

An investigation of the main processes of development, emphasizing cognition, perception, emotion, language and personality. Students with credit for PSYC 335, PSYC 336, or PSYC 339 cannot take this course for further credit. Credit will only be granted for one of PSYC 131 or PSYC 121. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: None.

PSYC 122  (3)  Developmental Psychology

A continuation of PSYC 121, including social factors in development, development according to ages and stages, and problems in development. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 121.

PSYC 131  (3)  Child Development I (Ends Apr 2017)

An introduction to theories, concepts and research pertaining to the development of children from the prenatal environment to early childhood. Designed primarily for the Early Childhood Education and Care program. Topics include physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional development in infancy and early childhood. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: None.

PSYC 131  (3)  Child Development I (Effective May 2017)

An introduction to theories, concepts and research pertaining to the development of children from the prenatal environment to early childhood. Topics include physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional development in infancy and early childhood. Designed primarily for the Early Childhood Education and Care program. Students with credit for PSYC 335, PSYC 336, or PSYC 339 cannot take this course for further credit. Credit will only be granted for one of PSYC 121 or PSYC 131. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: None.

PSYC 132  (3)  Child Development II

A continuation of PSYC 131. Topics include physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional development in middle childhood and adolescence. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 131.

PSYC 200  (3)  Computer Applications for Psychology

An introduction to computers and some basic programs and utilities useful to psychologists. Topics include word processing focusing on APA style, spreadsheets, databases, statistical packages, and the Internet. (0:0:3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112.

PSYC 204  (3)  Research Methods

An introduction to basic research methods with emphasis on the experimental method, design problems and associated statistical techniques, including hypothesis testing. Laboratory experience includes conducting experiments, data analysis and report generation using APA style guidelines. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112.

PSYC 205  (3)  Intro to Biological Psychology

An introduction to the biological bases of behaviour, using concepts from basic sciences. Topics include neural structure, function and organization, motor and sensory processes, brain structure and function, and behavioural genetics. (3:0:1)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111.

PSYC 208  (3)  Introduction to Cultural Psychology

Cultural psychology is concerned with ethnocentrism in psychology and aims to reveal the cultural influences on processes of perception, cognition, social behavior and interpersonal relations, self/identity, personality, gender roles, and abnormality. This course explores these issues and provides the student with a greater sensitivity for people from different cultures. Not open to students with credit in PSYC 308. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Second-year standing. Either PSYC 111 or PSYC 112 are recommended.

PSYC 210  (3)  History and Systems of Psychology

A survey of the development of psychological thought from the earliest times to the present. The times, the thought and the contributions of outstanding personalities in the history of psychology are examined, emphasizing how their contributions relate to the problems and concerns of contemporary psychology. Note: students who have credit for PSYC 201/202 may not take this course for credit. Credit will only be granted for one of PSYC 201 or PSYC 202 or PSYC 210. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112.

PSYC 300A  (3)  Statistical Methods in Psychology I (Ends Apr 2017)

A brief review of research methodology; univariate description, bivariate description, and an introduction to probability and inferential statistics as applied in Psychology. Introduction to microcomputer software and computer based analyses of statistical procedures covered in the course. (3:0:1)

Prerequisite: Min. "C+" in each of PSYC 111 and PSYC 112, and a min. "C" in each of PSYC 200 and PSYC 204, and a min. "C" in one of Principles of Math 12 or 3 credits of Math chosen from MATH 111, MATH 121, MATH 151, or MATH 191.

PSYC 300A  (3)  Statistical Methods in Psychology I

A brief review of research methodology; univariate description, bivariate description, and an introduction to probability and inferential statistics as applied in Psychology. Introduction to microcomputer software and computer based analyses of statistical procedures covered in the course. (3:0:1)

Prerequisite: A minimum combined "C+" average in PSYC 111 and PSYC 112, and a min. "C" in PSYC 204. One of Pre-calculus 11, Foundations of Mathematics 11, Principles of Mathematics 11, or Applications of Mathematics 11. Recommended: Any Math course taught at the Grade 12 level or one of MATH 111, MATH 121, MATH 151, or MATH 191.

PSYC 300B  (3)  Statistical Methods in Psychology II

This course contains a brief review of the topics covered in 300A and deals with statistical analysis procedures for two-group and multi-group experimental designs. The focus is on t-tests and analysis of variance. The differences between repeated measures and independent group designs and analyses are emphasized. Students are expected to analyze an experimental data set using the appropriate statistical procedures, and to prepare a research report. (3:0:1)

Prerequisite: Min. "C" in PSYC 300A.

PSYC 301  (3)  Research Practicum I

An opportunity to learn how to conduct quality research under the direction of a faculty member. Qualified students are required to apply to the department before registration can be completed. Projects are determined in consultation with the faculty member. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204. "B+" standing in all second-year Psychology courses, permission of instructor, and permission of Dean.

PSYC 302  (3)  Research Practicum II

An opportunity to learn how to conduct quality research under the direction of a faculty member. Qualified students are required to apply to the department before registration can be completed. Projects are determined in consultation with the faculty member. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 301, "B+" standing in all second-year Psychology courses, permission of instructor, and permission of Dean.

PSYC 304  (3)  Qualitative Research Methods in Psychology (Ends Apr 2017)

An introduction to qualitative research methods in Psychology. Methods include observation, interviews, ethnography, action research, participatory action research, cooperative inquiry and evaluation. Emphasizes theory and issues of analysis and interpretation. Students develop research skills and conduct a small research project to be presented in both oral and written form. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and PSYC 204 (which may be taken concurrently).

PSYC 304  (3)  Qualitative Research Methods in Psychology

An introduction to qualitative research methods in Psychology. Methods include observation, interviews, ethnography, action research, participatory action research, cooperative inquiry and evaluation. Emphasizes theory and issues of analysis and interpretation. Students develop research skills and conduct a small research project to be presented in both oral and written form. Credit will only be granted for one of CRIM 350 SOCI 350 SSID 350 or PSYC 304. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112.

Co-requisites: PSYC 204, CRIM 220, SOCI 250, or SSID 250.

PSYC 305  (3)  Introduction to Biopsychology II

An introduction to the biological bases of behaviour, using concepts from basic sciences. Topics include biological basis for sleep, drug addiction, laterality and language, health and emotions, and the biological basis for psychiatric disorders. This course is a continuation of PSYC 205. PSYC 305 was formerly called PSYC 206; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 205.

PSYC 307  (3)  Introduction to Evolutionary Psychology

A focus on the evolutionary adaptive significance of behaviour and on the development of behaviour that increases the probability of survival of one's progeny. Evolution serves as the intellectual foundation for this course. Topics include the evolutionary basis of the mind, language, reproduction, parental care, personality, and psychopathology. PSYC 307 was formerly called PSYC 207; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112.

PSYC 308  (3)  Cultural Psychology

Cultural psychology is concerned with ethnocentrism in psychology and aims to reveal the cultural influences on processes of perception, cognition, social behavior and interpersonal relations, self/identity, personality, gender roles, and abnormality. This course explores these issues and provides the student with a greater sensitivity for people from different cultures. Not open to students with credit for PSYC 208. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Third-year standing. Either PSYC 111 or PSYC 112 are recommended.

PSYC 310  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 210.

PSYC 310A  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: William James

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 310B  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: Carl Jung

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 310C  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: Karen Horney

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 310D  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: Sigmund Freud

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 310E  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: Lev Vygotsky

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 310F  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: Victor Frankl

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 310G  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: Alfred Adler

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 310H  (3)  Great Thinkers in the History of Psychology: George Herbert Mead

An exploration of some of the central figures in the emergence of psychology as a discipline. Topics include the subject matter and methodology of psychology; the mind/body problem; comparison of original work with current practices. Expands upon PSYC 210 and explores particular areas in greater depth, using original materials. Individuals studied vary from year to year. Can be taken more than once for credit. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 201, PSYC 202, or PSYC 210.

PSYC 313  (3)  Cognitive Psychology

An introduction to information processing analyses of mental processes. Topics include pattern recognition, attention, memory, systems, language processing, concept formation, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making. Relationships among these topic areas are described. Emphasizes understanding theories and relevant research in each area, and on the general relationship between research results and theory development. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, PSYC 204, and third-year standing.

PSYC 314  (3)  Introduction to the Psychology of Consciousness

An exploration of historical and contemporary issues in theory and research pertaining to the study of consciousness. Topics include perception and reality, artificial intelligence, evolution, the brain, and altered states. Emphasis is placed on both historical and current schools of thought and related methodology. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and third-year standing.

PSYC 315  (3)  Intro to Neuropsychology I

An overview of research and clinical techniques used to study and understand the human nervous system and its role in behaviour. Topics include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurological diagnostic techniques, neurological disorders, sensory and motor function and the functional associations with the lobes cerebral cortex. A study of how the human nervous system is functionally organized, and what data supports this model of functional organization. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and PSYC 205.

PSYC 317A  (3)  Sensation and Psychophysics

This course covers the physical basis of human sensory processing. The physiology of the visual, auditory and minor senses is covered with an emphasis on functional models of sensory system operation. Course material also includes topics related to the measurement of sensory experience. The four classic psychophysical problems of detection, recognition, discrimination and scaling are covered with an emphasis on their mathematical and statistical basis. (3:0:0 for 30 weeks)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and PSYC 204.

PSYC 318  (3)  Sensation and Perception

An introduction to how information about our internal and external environments is acquired through our senses and organized into perceptual experience. Topics include an understanding of organizational principles applied to sensory information; hypothesis testing aspects of perceptual experience; and learning to produce, control, and measure visual, auditory, somatosensory, and chemical stimuli. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and PSYC 205.

PSYC 323  (3)  Experimental Neuroscience

An introduction to advanced experimental neuroscience. Topics include basic functions of neurons and genes as well as review of selective topics in neuroplasticity, psychopharmacology, behavioural genetics, behavioural neuroendocrinology, neural development, and neurochemistry. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 205.

PSYC 324  (3)  Experimental Neuroscience II

An introduction to advanced experimental neuroscience. This course is a continuation of PSYC 323 and inludes topics in neuroplasticity, psychopharmacology, behavioural genetics, behavioural neuroendocrinology, neural development, and neurochemistry. Some laboratory work may be required. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 205.

PSYC 326  (3)  Learning Theory and Behaviour Change

An introduction to contemporary theories of learning and behaviour to discover how people learn and how their behaviours are later changed as a result of these processes. A further emphasis is given to developing skills in analyzing ongoing behaviour. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204.

PSYC 327  (3)  Health Psychology

A study of the relatively new field of health psychology, focusing on the behavioural determinants of health, and current concepts of wellness. Practical applications are acquired in the area of stress management. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and PSYC 205, or third-year standing in the BSc in Nursing.

PSYC 330  (3)  Personality

An introduction to personality theory and its applications. A survey of several major strategies followed in conceptualizing personality, e.g., psychoanalytic, dispositional plus emphasis on the measurement of personality and current research methods. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204.

PSYC 331  (3)  Social Psychology

Advanced issues in social and psychological theories and research are explored. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204.

PSYC 332  (3)  Community Psychology

Theories developed in PSYC 331 are applied within a community setting. Projects are tailored to the need of the individual and to the community in which they are working. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and PSYC 331.

PSYC 333  (3)  Positive Psychology

An exploration of the emerging field of positive psychology. Psychologists have traditionally treated mental illness from a perspective of repairing damaged habits, damaged drives, damaged childhoods, and damaged brains. Yet, Psychology also studies strengths, optimism, happiness, hope, and resiliency. Positive psychology focuses on the promotion of well-being and happiness. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 or any methods class with permission of instructor.

PSYC 334  (3)  Industrial/Organizational Psychology

An introduction to the theories, methods, and applications of industrial and organizational psychology. Topics include personnel recruitment and selection, employee training and development, performance appraisal, work attitudes and motivation, psychological well-being at work, occupational health and safety, leadership and group processes, and organizational design. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and PSYC 204 (or a comparable methods class with permission of instructor).

PSYC 335  (3)  Infant and Child Development

An overview of research examining psychological processes from conception through about 12 years of age. Topics include prenatal development, physical growth, perceptual and cognitive processes, language acquisition, personality development, and social processes. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and third-year standing.

PSYC 336  (3)  Adolescent Development

An overview of research examining psychological processes during adolescence. Topics include physical development, cognitive processes, emotional development, social processes, and psychopathology. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, PSYC 204, and third-year standing.

PSYC 338  (3)  Death and Dying: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

An exploration of cultural, historical, and contemporary issues in theory and research pertaining to the study of death and dying. Topics will include attitudes towards death and dying, developmental perspectives, care for the dying, grief, and spirituality. All topics will be considered from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives. Credit will only be granted for one of ANTH 338 or PSYC 338. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Third-year standing.

PSYC 339  (3)  Adult Development and Aging

An overview of research examining psychological processes during adulthood and aging. Topics include biological processes, perceptual and cognitive processes, personality and social processes, sources of stress, psychopathology, and death. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and third-year standing.

PSYC 340  (3)  Interpersonal Communication

The course examines human communication, with particular emphasis on face-to face interaction. The topics covered are verbal communication, nonverbal communication, interpersonal systems, and systemic approaches to psychopathology. This is a theory and research course using primary sources; it does not teach communication skills, mass communication, or applied communication. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and third-year standing.

PSYC 345  (3)  Drugs and Behaviour - Basic Principles

An introductory course designed to review the scientific literature on drugs, behaviour, and the central nervous system. Topics include introductions to pharmacology, neuropharmacology, the experimental analysis of behaviour, and the behavioural determinants of drug action. PSYC 345 was formerly called PSYC 345A; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 205.

PSYC 365  (3)  Sleep and Biological Rhythms

Designed to give students an appreciation for the role of sleep and biological rhythms in determining behaviour. This course will cover basic anatomy and physiology of the hypothalamus, the role of biological rhythms and sleep in various mental states and the basics of sleep recording. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and PSYC 205.

PSYC 385  (3)  Motivation and Emotion

A critical examination of the motivational and emotional processes that underlie the initiation and persistence of human behaviour. Topics include the behavioural and psychological aspects of motivation, motivational systems, the impact of emotion on motivation, and the general principles and issues related to individual emotions. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and PSYC 112.

PSYC 390  (3)  Selected Topics I

For senior students to pursue an advanced topic in Psychology through intensive, independent work that extends or goes beyond material covered in any current 3rd or 4th year course. Qualified students are required to approach potential faculty supervisors to discuss their project proposals before registration is possible. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Third-year standing in Psychology, minimum of 12 credits in upper-level Psychology courses, and "B+" average in all Psychology coursework.

PSYC 391  (3)  Selected Topics II

For senior students to pursue an advanced topic in Psychology through intensive, independent work that extends or goes beyond material covered in any current 3rd or 4th year course. Qualified students are required to approach potential faculty supervisors to discuss their project proposals before registration is possible. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 390, third-year standing in Psychology, minimum of 12 credits in upper-level Psychology courses, and "B+" average in all Psychology coursework.

PSYC 400  (3)  Applied Methods in Psychology

Provides the critical thinking and research skills necessary to design and conduct research in a variety of applied settings. An introduction to a variety of research design, measurement and analytical strategies, as well as the writing of grant proposals and reports. PSYC 400 was formerly called PSYC 399; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 and PSYC 300A.

PSYC 403  (3)  Forensic Psychology

This course covers theory and research in the emerging field of forensic psychology, and refers broadly to the research and application of psychological knowledge to the legal system. Topics include the development of criminal behaviour, theories of crime, eyewitness memory, jury decision making, competency and criminal responsibility, crime prevention and rehabilitation. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: One of PSYC 204, CRIM 220, or SOCI 250.

PSYC 410  (3)  Theoretical Issues in Psychology I

An examination of the basic assumptions that underlie various psychological practices and systems with an emphasis upon identifying implicit principles and opinions. Topics include reductionism, determinism, mechanism, idealism, materialism, dualism, and other philosophical doctrines rooted in psychological discourse. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 210.

PSYC 415  (3)  Introduction to Human Neuropsychology II

A continuation of PSYC 315. A study of neuroanatomical associations with major classes of human behaviour, neuropsychological assessment techniques based upon these associations, and case studies of humans with brain lesions. Note: May not be taken by students with credit earned in PSYC 315 prior to 1998. PSYC 415 was formerly called PSYC 316; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 315.

PSYC 419  (3)  Cognitive Neuroscience

A survey of cognitive theories, neuroscience methods, and models of brain function. Topics include history of cognitive neuroscience, neural basis of cognition, methods and examples of neuroscience research findings related to psychological processes. Evolutionary, developmental and plastic aspects of cognition are also studied from a neuroscience perspective. PSYC 419 was formerly called PSYC 319; credit will not be granted for both courses. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 315.

PSYC 430  (3)  Abnormal Psychology

A general introduction to abnormal psychology. An exploration of the historical and contemporary perspectives of abnormal behaviour, as well as the assessment and treatment of various psychological disorders. Classification, diagnostic, and methodological issues are discussed. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and PSYC 204.

PSYC 432  (3)  Fundamentals of Clinical Psychology

An introduction to the scientific and applied aspects of clinical psychology. Topics include the historical development of the professions, models of training, legal, ethical, and professional issues, issues in assessment, measurement and observation, and theoretical models of intervention. Discussions of theoretical and scientific aspects of clinical psychology are complemented with rich case material and a familiarization with community services and resources. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and PSYC 204.

PSYC 433  (3)  Human Sexuality

This course examines the psychological, biological, and social science of human sexuality. Topics include the sexual response cycle, sexuality over the lifespan, gender, sexual orientation, sexual disorders, and sex therapy. Sexuality in society will also be examined including sex for sale, pornography, sex education, cultural and ethical issues. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204.

PSYC 436  (3)  Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence

An overview of theoretical and empirical approaches to the understanding of developmentally related disorders of childhood and adolescence. Students become familiar with historical and contemporary perspectives on the etiology of developmentally related disorders of childhood and adolescence, as well as the assessment and treatment of various psychological disorders. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204.

PSYC 440  (3)  Skills and Techniques in Counseling and Psychotherapy

This course introduces common counseling techniques and begins to develop basic practice skills. The focus will be on client-centred techniques, such as developing the therapeutic relationship and empathic listening, as well as cognitive-behavioral interventions. Students will be expected to actively participate in both discussions and skills practice. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 430.

PSYC 441  (3)  Theories of Addiction

This course explores the history of drug abuse and a number of different explanations for addiction including the disease model, the dopamine hypothesis, the learning model, the environmental/social inequity model and a community model. The impact of different explanations on approaches to treatment will also be discussed. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Psyc 345.

PSYC 445  (3)  Clinical Neuropharmacology and Therapeutics

Designed to provide psychology students with a working understanding of current pharmacological treatment regimes for the mentally ill. Treatment for depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, OCD, anxiety and Alzheimer's among others will be reviewed and current research evaluated. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 205. PSYC 345 and PSYC 430 are recommended.

PSYC 450  (3)  Environmental Psychology

An introduction to the area of environmental psychology. Topics include environmental-behaviour relations; environmental perception, cognition and assessment; mutual influences of individuals and the natural environment; resources management, natural and technological disasters; pollution; the dynamics and design of social spaces and others. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, and PSYC 204, or a comparable methods class with permission of instructor.

PSYC 490  (3)  Senior Project Proposal (Ends Jun 2017)

For advanced students of psychology who plan to enter a graduate program of psychology. The Senior Project Proposal will involve bibliographic research of a special topic culminating in an empirical study undertaken in Psychology 491, Senior Project. Qualified students are required to approach potential faculty supervisors to discuss their project proposals prior to registration. In addition to the supervisor, the students will be required to approach two other faculty to compose a Senior Project Committee well in advance of their anticipated start date. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing in Psychology and "B+" average in all Psychology coursework.

PSYC 490  (3)  Honours Thesis Proposal (Effective Jun 2017)

The Honours Thesis Proposal will involve completion of a research proposal and an ethics application culminating in an empirical study undertaken in PSYC 491. Students are required to submit an Honours Application by May 15th of the year preceding their final year of study to the Psychology Honours Advisor. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Psychology Honours program.

PSYC 491  (3)  Senior Project (Ends Jun 2017)

For advanced students of psychology who plan entry into a graduate program of psychology. A continuation of Psychology 490, Senior Project Proposal. Students will be expected to complete an empirical study and deliver a written and an oral presentation of the project. In addition to the supervisor there should be two other faculty on the student's Senior Project Committee. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 490 and recommendation of the student's committee.

PSYC 491  (3)  Honours Thesis (Effective Jun 2017)

A continuation of PSYC 490, Honours Thesis Proposal. Students will be expected to complete an empirical study, submit a written thesis, and deliver an oral presentation and defense. An honours committee comprised of a supervisor, another psychology department faculty member, and one other qualified committee member is required. (3:0:0)

Prerequisite: Min. "B-" in PSYC 490 and recommendation of the student's supervisory committee.

PSYC 498  (3)  Selected Topics in Psychology

A presentation of selected topics of current interest in Psychology. Students interested in this course should consult with the Department Chair regarding when this course is to be offered and what substantive areas are to be studied. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 or a comparable methods class with permission of instructor.

PSYC 498A  (3)  Selected Topics in Psychology: Human Brain Disorders

A presentation of selected topics of current interest in Psychology. Students interested in this course should consult with the Department Chair regarding when this course is to be offered and what substantive areas are to be studied. (0:3:0)

Prerequisite: PSYC 204 or a comparable methods class with permission of instructor.

PSYC 499  (3)  Field Placement in Psychology

An opportunity to develop professional roles and applied work experience through short work placements with community based agencies. Students will be expected to contact a psychology faculty member and express their interest in the fall semester. (0:0:0 —100)

Prerequisite: PSYC 300A , fourth-year standing (84 credits), and a min. "B+" grade point average.

PSYC 499B  (3)  Field Placement in Psychology B

An opportunity to develop professional roles and applied work experience through short work placements with community based agencies. Students will be expected to contact a psychology faculty member and express their interest in the semester preceding registration for the course. This course is a continuation of and taken after completion of PSYC 499. (0:0:0 —100)

Prerequisite: PSYC 499, fourth-year standing (84 credits), and a min. "B+" grade point average.

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